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that day. >> we must get in this revolution, and complete the revolution. for in the delta of mississippi, in southwest georgia, the black belt of alabama, in harlem, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis. and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to
: smiting goliath might as well be marshall ganz's job description. it began in mississippi's freedom summer of 1964 when his fury against injustice pulled him out of harvard and into the struggle for civil rights. from there, he signed on with the legendary cesar chavez and the united farm workers and for 16 years, struggled to unionize the men and women in the fields of california who toiled endless hours and mounting days, picking crops for next to nothing. three decades after marshall ganz had dropped out of harvard, he went back to finish his degree and earn a doctorate. a few years later, he was asked to become the architect behind the obama campaign's skillful organizing of students and volunteers. today, marshall ganz is a founder of the leading change network, a global community of organizers, educators and researchers mobilizing for democracy. you'll find more of his experience and philosophy in this book, "why david sometimes wins" marshall ganz, it's good to meet you. >> marshall ganz: it's good to meet you, bill. >> bill moyers: stories have been a powerful part of your life. wh
of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
and thunderstorms east of the mississippi. and the heaviest, from new york down to the carolinas. >> upper 70s from boston to new york. 80s in the midwest. 90s in the southeast. triple digits for dallas and phoenix. >>> innovative fast food. wait until you see the breakfast treat taco bell is rolling out in more areas. >> it's a good one. >>> plus, a hot air balloon plummets to the ground with an american family onboard. and the prominent california man killed in the crash. >>> a heart scare for george w. bush. the former president waking up in a hospital. why doctors decided to operate >>> checking out to be another nervous day on wall street, as stocks open lower for the second-straight day. the dow lost 93 points on fears that the federal reserve could begin pulling back on its massive infusion of cash that's been so popular with traders. >>> the feds are going after bank of america as the government tries to clean up the behavior that led to the great recession. the justice department is suing b of a for allegedly lying to investors about the risks of the toxic loans that led to the housing col
. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every person to cast a ballot. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom must be tended to in order -- for us to grow. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable mit
of mississippi where races suffocating part of everyday life. cory's version of the best was yet no idea these were police. he shot and fired one of these figures to protect himself and his daughter and as soon as he realized, surrendered in chapters 10 to three bullets left in the gun. the states version was cory the out the window and saw a team of police is coming at him, that he decided to take them on with a handgun that he shot and killed one of them and surrendered with the listen again. decide which of those those in areas hit by more plausible. basically he had a roach in his house that would lend him a $50 fine. he was charged and convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death. i was scared to the legal stuff that happened in between. eventually a couple years ago from his conviction was overturned by the mississippi supreme court. the prosecutors decided they would allow him to plead with manslaughter and he would get time served. at this point in prison for 10 years. at his homecoming party in mississippi, taking kids out for rides on his four wheeler and everybody's happ
in mississippi. and i think part of it was that these young idealistic college students wanted to understand these people, not as abstractions, not as enemies, not as human beings and that's exactly why -- what agee accomplishes but the other thing they were drawn to was that it showed them how to live without armor. it showed them how to live according to the principles without compromise. i teach "let us now praise famous men," or try to do my freshman and they hate it. i don't care. [laughter] because there are a couple of every semester t who did it and it's worth it but it's worth it. and "let us now praise famous men," as many of yo you know, is a book that you can't get past the first few pages or it changes your life. and i think in the early '60s there were people who wanted to change, who were eager for the change. and "let us now praise famous men" really spoke to that. >> is it true, agee's reputation as you say, the book itself is a commercial and more or less political flaw but he did live in new york and he had friends, and some of them talked to them. irving howe, paul goodma
28th, 1955, emmett till was dragged from his cousin's home in mississippi and lynched. that lynching was part of what launched a civil rights movement. in 1963 on august 28th, dr. king stood and articulated a dream for the nation. on august 28th, 2008, president obama or then senator obama stood and accepted the nomination of the democratic party for the u.s. presidency. today, he will speak to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march. from that lynching on august 28th to this moment of an african-american president on august 28th, there have been real accomplishments. there have been real changes. we have to acknowledge that, in fact, we have made progress as a country. at the same time, that we must absolutely recognize the continuing structural barriers that exist in terms of economic inequality, unfairness in the workplace, lack of opportunity in housing, often lack of opportunity in education from k through 12, as well as in higher education, and, of course, the realities of continuing residential segregation that impact everything from our health to our opportunities to ge
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
father and sister said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children
and particularly the right to vote to people of color in mississippi. i hadn't -- i didn't know him well but i had covered him on a fairly regular basis. and when he was assassinated in an especially cowardly and despicable way, i was tipped to the shooting and we were the first people covering it, news people at the scene. so i knew medgar and had met his family before. i had met his brother at the airport and we formed a bond which lasts to this day, i'm happy to say. i've always had a bond with medgar's family partly because i know firsthand, i bore witness to how heroic his efforts were to bring freedom and justice in the darkest corners of mississippi at a bad time. by the way, it's little noted nor very often remembered that the march on washington for which dr. king rightly became so famous was originally designed to be primarily a march in memory of medgar evers and what had happened to medgar evers. that got lost in the shuffle of the day as it developed and has been lost in the history and reporting since that time. >> well, dan rather, you have provided so much detail and illumination a
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
continues in the south with temperatures near or above 100 degrees from texas to mississippi. and the atlantic coast will see its share of wet weather. >>> in sports, the los angeles angels just can't seem to solve the texas rangers. in the first inning the angels tie the game at 2-2 on back-to-back homers, but in the eighth, rangers' third baseman adrian beltre slaps an rbi single to right field to break a 3-3 tie. texas adds four runs in the ninth for an 8-3 win. >>> and some gnatty finance between nl east rivals washington and atlanta. bryce harper gives the nationals a 1-0 lead when he homers to center field. the next time bryce harper comes to the plate, he's hit by a pitch and tempers flair as he heads toward first base. while the benches were cleared, no punches were thrown, no one was ejected. the braves win, 2-1, their 12th straight victory. >>> and, finally, it's hard enough to bowl a perfect game, but the way one bowler lost his bid for a 300 was heartbreaking. >> looking for perfection, 300. come on, ball. oh, my god. >> oh, no. >> holy cow. did you see that? >> o
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
mississippi on sunday turning roads into rivers. flooding has not been this bad since hurricane katrina in 2005. >>> in england, outrage grows after the partner of newspaper reporter glenn greenwald is detained under a uk terrorism act. david miranda was released after nine hours of questioning. this is according to "guardian" newspaper. no charges were filed but cell phone and other items were confiscated. greenwald works for the guardian newspaper and broke the story of the secret surveillance programs in the united states. >>> in other news, a new week of trading on wall street and stocks are expected to open flat. investors take a breath following two weeks of losses. ringing the opening bell this morning, representatives from american corporate profits. there they are, just about to ring the bell. >>> one-on-one with the future king. prince william sat down with max foster opening up about parenthood for the first time since the birth of his son, george. of course, the prince talked about that moment he walked out of the hospital with his wife and his son to that incredible media f
and his work has been cited by the supreme court. his writing is cited as an excerpt of the mississippi seizing supreme court and has had a direct impact. mark lomax is effective after the national technical association data previously worked in liberia west africa is a program manager for the united nations overseeing the liberian police and emergency response unit and a police response unit. he is also served as director for the bureau of education beauty retired from the pennsylvania state police for 27 is a service and a graduate of the fbi national academy. with that i will turn things over to radley. >> thank you and thanks for cato for putting this on and thanks for mark and the nt 08 for agreeing to have a conversation with us today. i'm just going to jump right in. so, right around thanksgiving in 2006 a narcotics task force in the atlanta police department was out on patrol i guess and they saw someone walking alongside the road that guy that they had previously arrested for various drug offenses. they jumped out on him through him to the ground pulled a gun on him and a week
of quebec. who first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river? >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes, no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't even know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we do have some news this morning. coming up. developing story out of michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by allegedly mistreating cancer patients. the feds have raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie. he's 28 years old. after serving time for a crime he didn't commit, brian banks is finally getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story and his attitude is extraordinary. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and in these dog days of summer, you may have seen the infomercials for the items such as the chillow. that's a pillow that keeps your head cool while you sleep. this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products throug
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
the gulf coast and florida panhandle all the way into south carolina. gulfport, mississippi, the floodwaters receding there but with more rain in the forecast they may rise yet again. tracking it all for us is chad myers. ha is the latest, chad? >> anderson, when you have a stationary front, like a stationary bike, things don't move. you can pedal that bike all you want, it is not going anywhere. these storms aren't going anywhere. so what is raining now was raining an hour ago and what was raining this weekend is pretty much still raining at this point. look at these five-day rainfall totals. this is from friday afternoon to now. 12.5 inches in florida thachlt is a beach. not much of a beach vacation. panama city, popular place, ten inches of rainfall over the weekend. everywhere that you see red, that's six inches. at purple higher than that, and the ten-inch bulls eyes, macon, georgia, has 24 more inches on ground than they should have. so when it rains, it floods. there's no place for the water to soak in. it's been like that for days and days and days and the rain conti
civil rights workers dead, i knew there was killing in 1964 in mississippi. that's why i think we have to press on. and those of us in the congress have to find a way to fix what the supreme court did. >> rose: john lewis, thank you. >> thank you very much. good to see you. >> rose: the book is called "march." it is a history of the civil rights movement and you will understand more of the trieldz and difficult times and the triumph of the civil rights movement in america as it took place from the streets to legislation in congress to speeches and motivated by the sacrifice of thousands of people. >> i would simply like to say i think this has been one of the great days of america. >> rose: we continue this evening as we take note of the 50th anniversary of the march oning with. on august 28, dr. martin luther king delivered his "i have a dream" speech. it was an american important moment in history, and paved the way for the voting rights act of 1965. half a century later, our first african american president has been elected for a second term but we're still far from realizing equali
, kansas, massachusetts, maryland, michigan, minnesota, mississippi, montana, new hampshire, new mexico and washington state. >> good for mississippi. >> bill: how about that. unfortunately, there are still too many kids who are suffering from obesity. one in eight preschoolers in the united states is obese according to the cdc. a third of u.s. children and teens and still more than 2/3 of adults. so you know, we're not out of the woods yet but some good news on that front. president obama talked about this last night with jay leno and he gave some credit where i think credit is due. >> obama: to michelle's credit, the let's move initiative that she's been involved with, that has gotten so many folks all around the country doing stuff to help kids exercise and eat right, for the first time in a long time, we've started to see some modest reduction in childhood obesity. [ applause ] >> bill: very important cause that the first lady has taken on. i think she's done a damn good job of it. and she's had people in the white house. she's done videos. you know what? it's working! we just gotta
it was just the way i was cultivated -- i don't know, it was just the way i was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary place because emmett till was murdered there. , when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say -- all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who complaining -- guest: who was complaining? well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain -- you know, get over what happened in the past. south.you are from th
to be a person that is helping the cause and not coming against it. >> you grew up in mississippi? >> i did. kelly, i am two generations short from maids and farmers. it's because of my father, the late reverend james thomas mcclowen, that my mother got to go to high school. he built the first black high school in mississippi, my town. we have a long way to go. my father worked heavily to help integrate schools in mississippi. but today we don't have a level playing field when it comes to education. today the new plantation is the prison system. we have more black males in the prison system. so with the hard work that my father did and by the way, he was assistant warden also in the prison where before my father got there, there were chain gangs. my father really believed that you could rehabilitate the criminal. so we have a long way to go with the inner city, with people now on welfare, more so than ever before. so we have equal opportunity. do we have equal access? >> jack gains, thank you. joe freeman, good friends of mine. thank you both. juan williams, always good to have you. angela,
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
is alive this morning. we say hey y'all. fine folks from mississippi. >> tupelo, mississippi. >> home of elvis presley. thanks for being here this morning. let's show what you can expect today. wilmington, north carolina, hello to everyone watching us this morning, wect. watch for scattered thunderstorms today and temperature right around 85 degrees. it is the same old story for us in the southeast. more showers and storms, including the carolinas, up to the virginias. the rest of the country, primarily dry. hot, especially in the west. exacerbating the fire issues out there. forecast, stalled front across the southeast, more showers and storms. looking beautiful >>> hey, thanks, mike. good morning to you. 8:07. back to work monday. this is san francisco where you can see that compressed marine layer. let's show you what it looks like now on the golden gate bridge where you can hardly see anything at all. please travel cautiously. 72 degrees in the city headed your way. elsewhere, we do have a chance for thunderstorms and we have a red flag warning in place for today, tomorrow, all th
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary --ace because emmett till was because emmett till was murdered there. and yet, when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. host: michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. caller: yeah, hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who they are in good complaining -- -- quit and planning. guest: who was complaining? caller: well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- guest: why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain you know, get over what happened in the past. guest: you are from th
.s. senate. the answer is seven beginning in 1870 with rebels of mississippi. this year marked the first time that two ochls servafrican-amer simultaneously served in the senate and if cory booker wins next month, two african-americans together in the senate. lee is the winner! send your suggestions at msnbc.com. we will be right back. ♪ you don't have the time to hang around ♪ ♪ [ whimpers ] - hugs from beneful baked delights... - [ barks ] are crispy, oven-baked dog snacks with soft savory centers, made with beef and cheese. beneful baked delights: a unique collection of four snacks... to help spark play in your day. because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities.. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfect
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